Remembering All C. diff. Survivors With Warm Thoughts and Gratitude In The New Year

2014 is coming to a close and 2015 is just a few hours away.CDIFF2015wordss

 

As the New Year approaches, our thoughts turn gratefully to those who have helped us in our progress and the progress of our communities.  It is in this spirit we say, simply and sincerely,  thank you.

 

 

Thank you for everything big and small you do to help make the C Diff Foundation a better resource in the lives of others, providing support, and for joining us in raising C. diff. awareness to the millions of families, healthcare providers, communities, and friends worldwide.

We are a giving Foundation and a lot of that giving is facilitated through each of you.  Giving makes a difference and there are so many different ways to give.  Whether it is through presentations at a conference,  sharing your journey with others, joining the Foundation’s volunteer program, or donating time in November for the “Raising C Diff Awareness” campaign in communities across the globe the partnered efforts and contributions are greatly appreciated. Through the many facets of giving and charitable support, the Foundation’s mission continues to move forward in educating, and advocating for C. diff. prevention, treatments, and environmental safety worldwide.

From all of us to all of you and your families,  we send our best wishes for a peaceful, happier, healthier, and successful 2015!

Thank you and Happy New Year.

C. diff. Survivor; Kristin Evans

Kristin’s C. diff. Survivor Story:
I contracted c.diff. when I had my gallbladder taken out in July of 2012. I was experiencing a lot of abdominal pain and diarrhea but attributed it to my body adjusting without the organ I went to the ER around 21 times over a year and a half before I was finally diagnosed with C.diff.
After that began the real journey, after loosing over 100 pounds in a year which took me from a size 10 to a size double 0 my doctor decided the repeated rounds of Vancomycin were not fighting the infection he suggested a fecal transplant. I was very confident in this procedure as I had only heard amazing and positive things about it.
I had the transplant done and waited a month to be checked again as I was told to by my doctor. I went in and of course the transplant failed. I was then put on more vanco and told to stay on it for another month then they would check me again.
Another 2 weeks went by and I was emergency admitted to the local hospital because my body had begun to shut down and my organs were beginning to fail. I was on full isolation for 2 weeks until the declared me c.diff. free. I was told sent home with a new problem caused by the c.diff. though.
I now had enlarged lymph nodes and they would not go down so I had an oncologist look at them and told me I had a possibility of Hodgkins Lymphoma and was scheduled for a lymphectomy a month later. After surgery I was cleared from cancer but I had contracted c.diff. back because of the surgery.
I was then diagnosed with chronic c.diff. and told we would try another transplant to try and kill the infection that was slowly killing me again.
The second *fecal transplant was again a failure and I was put on vanco for another year before I told my doctor I was going to die if he didn’t help me.
I had survived almost 3 years fighting this battle and my body was physically and mentally drained. I was tired of fighting, so he made the decision to hospitalize me again to try and cure this once and for all. I was in for almost a week before I was declared once again C.diff. free.
It has now been less than a month since my release and I am learning to deal with my new medical problems caused by c.diff. including gastroenteritis, ulcerative colitis, severe chronic IBS and permanent bowel damage.
I have been to the ER a total of 46 times throughout my journey with c.diff. and am still continuing to get my body back to way it needs to be with my weight and my eating which has become difficult due to the bowel damage.
But i will not give up and i will survive and fight this if it ever returns i will not let c.diff. take my life. Thanks for reading my story guys.

C. diff. Survivors – Look Back and Remember How Far You’ve Come

Sometimes the most powerful way to keep moving forward is to look back and remember how far we’ve come.

I had to do that just about every day during my healing journey.

There were so many times I wanted to give up or quit because I didn’t think I could make it anymore… but then I would remember how far I had come and that would be enough to get through another day.

Today is all about how far you’ve come.

Think about one input you changed that completely improved your symptoms.

This could be your diet or a supplement you took… or how the C. diff. infection was killed.

Then, leave a comment below and share that input with this community. It might just be the one input someone else needs to read today in order to get to the next level of health.

We look forward to seeing you in the comments.

A Fellow C. diff. Survivor

Hope For The Holiday Season

candleThere Is Hope For The Holidays

 

If you or a loved one has been affected by a catastrophic illness or the fight of combating a C.diff. infection, or any long-term illness, the holiday season might not feel like the “most wonderful time of the year.”

 

Instead of joy, one may be struggling with sadness, grief, or anxiety that you won’t be spending the holidays in your own old fashion ways. There may be worries about money, time, or energy to partake in the holidays. There are ways to help make the most of the holiday season.

Begin with setting realistic goals, starting new holiday traditions, and calling for help when you need it is the first step in helping one to cope. Below are several tips from mental health experts that we hope will be useful to anyone in distress while fighting any illness.

Set Realistic Goals: This may not be the best holiday but with a positive outlook, and the support of family and friends, one can still make the most of it. Adapting to setbacks after or during an illness can cause stress, anxiety, and sadness. Try to be realistic about gift-giving and affordability and what can be done around the holidays, and share your thoughts with friends and family. Being honest about feelings and the present circumstances can help you better cope and give everyone the chance to have a better understanding. Make time to have a conversation will be very beneficial.

Start New Traditions: If you are celebrating the holidays away from your own home or away from loved ones, start a new tradition to help yourself and your family adjust to the changes. Activities like singing holiday songs or reading books aloud can help you maintain a positive outlook. Trying something new can create positive results. The new traditions will help create something special.

Surround Yourself with Support: The holidays can be a difficult for adults and children. When an individual is feeling down, lacking energy, in pain, combating an infection of any kind – one tends to isolate themselves. Do the best to avoid too much alone time, and talk to someone about how you are feeling. You are not alone and there are local numbers available in all areas to call for confidential crisis counseling and emotional support.

CONTACT USA (CUSA) is a network of crisis intervention helpline centers across the nation providing help by telephone and online chat for those in need of help.

http://www.contact-usa.org/programs.html

 

Treat Yourself with Care: It is important to pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Doing so will help you cope with stress caused by the holidays. If you are a parent or caregiver, it is important for you to take care of your needs first. Then you will be better able to take care of those who depend on you.

Reach Out for Help: Recovery takes time after a loss and even an illness – it is common to feel a lot of different emotions – anger, sadness, anxiety, confusion, guilt, and bitterness.  You are not alone.

 

Take it one-day-at-a-time………. live life in the moment and take it one step at a time.